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Sense and Sensibility 1899 edition1899 edition

Sense and Sensibility

Publication details ▽ Publication details △

First publication
1811

Type of publication
Novel

Genres
Literary, romance

Writing language
English

Author's country
England

Length
Approx. 127,000 words

Sense and Sensibility

THE NOVEL | THE TEXT

Notable lines

First lines

The family of Dashwood had long been settled in Sussex. Their estate was large, and their residence was at Norland Park, in the centre of their property, where, for many generations, they had lived in so respectable a manner as to engage the general good opinion of their surrounding acquaintance.

Passages

"Brandon is just the kind of man," said Willoughby one day, when they were talking of him together, "whom every body speaks well of, and nobody cares about; whom all are delighted to see, and nobody remembers to talk to."

Yet there is something so amiable in the prejudices of a young mind, that one is sorry to see them give way to the reception of more general opinions.

"The more I know of the world, the more I am convinced that I shall never see a man whom I can really love. I require so much!"

"I wish as well as every body else to be perfectly happy; but, like every body else it must be in my own way. Greatness will not make me so."

Last line

Between Barton and Delaford, there was that constant communication which strong family affection would naturally dictate;–and among the merits and the happiness of Elinor and Marianne, let it not be ranked as the least considerable, that though sisters, and living almost within sight of each other, they could live without disagreement between themselves, or producing coolness between their husbands.

— Eric McMillan

THE NOVEL | THE TEXT

See also:

Author
Charlotte Brontë

Novel
Jane Eyre

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