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LolitaFirst U.S. edition 1958
By Vladimir Nabokov
Publication details ▽ Publication details △

First publication
1955, France

First U.S. publication
1958

Literary form
Novel

Genre
Literary

Writing language
English

Author's country
Russia, United States, Switzerland

Length
Approx. 112,000 words

Lolita

CRITIQUE | THE TEXT | THE MOVIES

Notable lines

First lines

"Lolita, or the Confession of a White Widowed Male," such were the two titles under which the writer of the present note received the strange pages it preambulates.

"Foreword"

Lolita, light of my life, fire of my loins. My sin, my soul. Lo-lee-ta: the tip of the tongue taking a trip of three steps down the palate to tap, at three, on the teeth. Lo. Lee. Ta.
She was Lo, plain Lo, in the morning, standing four feet ten in one sock. She was Lola in slacks. She was Dolly at school. She was Dolores on the dotted line. But in my arms she was always Lolita.

"Part One"

Passages

Lo-lee-ta: the tip of the tongue taking a trip of three steps down the palate to tap, at three, on the teeth. Lo. Lee. Ta.

You can always count on a murderer for a fancy prose style. Ladies and gentlemen of the jury, exhibit number one is what the seraphs, the misinformed, simple, noble-winged seraphs, envied. Look at this tangle of thorns.

I am sufficiently proud of my knowing something to be modest about my not knowing all.

You have to be an artist and a madman, a creature of infinite melancholy, with a bubble of hot poison in your loins and a super-voluptuous flame permanently aglow in your subtle spine (oh, how you have to cringe and hide!), in order to discern at once, by ineffable signs―the slightly feline outline of a cheekbone, the slenderness of a downy limbs, and other indices which despair and shame and tears of tenderness forbid me to tabulate―the little deadly demon among the wholesome children; she stands unrecognized by them and unconscious herself of her fantastic power.

It was love at first sight, at last sight, at ever and ever sight.

We had been everywhere. We had really seen nothing. And I catch myself thinking today that our long journey had only defiled with a sinuous trail of slime the lovely, trustful, dreamy, enormous country that by then, in retrospect, was no more to us than a collection of dog-eared maps, ruined tour books, old tires, and her sobs in the night — every night, every night — the moment I feigned sleep.

I have often noticed that we are inclined to endow our friends with the stability of type that literary characters acquire in the reader's mind.

We fell to wrestling again. We rolled all over the floor, in each other's arms, like two huge helpless children. He was naked and goatish under his robe, and I felt suffocated as he rolled over me. I rolled over him. We rolled over me. They rolled over him. We rolled over us.

You know, what's so dreadful about dying is that you are completely on your own.

Last lines

I am thinking of aurochs and angels, the secret of durable pigments, prophetic sonnets, the refuge of art. And this is the only immortality you and I may share, my Lolita.

 

CRITIQUE | THE TEXT | THE MOVIES

See also:

Novel
The Catcher in the Rye

Novel
On the Road

Novel
Portnoy's Complaint

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Lolita

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