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Sketchbook of Geoffrey Crayon, 1895 editionCollection, 1895 illustrated Van Tassel edition
Publication details ▽ Publication details △

First published
1819 in serially published The Sketch Book of Geoffrey Crayon, Gent.

Literary form
Novella

Genres
Literary, Gothic, fantasy, horror

Writing language
English

Author's country
United States

Length
Approx. 11,800 words

The Legend of Sleepy Hollow

CRITIQUE | THE TEXT | THE MOVIE

Notable lines

First line

In the bosom of one of those spacious coves which indent the eastern shore of the Hudson, at that broad expansion of the river denominated by the ancient Dutch navigators the Tappan Zee, and where they always prudently shortened sail and implored the protection of St. Nicholas when they crossed, there lies a small market town or rural port, which by some is called Greensburgh, but which is more generally and properly known by the name of Tarry Town.

Passages

All these, however, were mere terrors of the night, phantoms of the mind that walk in darkness; and though he had seen many spectres in his time, and been more than once beset by Satan in divers shapes, in his lonely pre-ambulations, yet daylight put an end to all these evils; and he would have passed a pleasant life of it, in despite of the Devil and all his works, if his path had not been crossed by a being that causes more perplexity to mortal man than ghosts, goblins, and the whole race of witches put together, and that was—a woman.

"No! no! My engagement is with no bride—the worms! the worms expect me! I am a dead man—I have been slain by robbers—my body lies at Wurtzburg—at midnight I am to be buried—the grave is waiting for me—I must keep my appointment!"

Last lines

The old country wives, however, who are the best judges of these matters, maintain to this day that Ichabod was spirited away by supernatural means; and it is a favorite story often told about the neighborhood round the winter evening fire. The bridge became more than ever an object of superstitious awe; and that may be the reason why the road has been altered of late years, so as to approach the church by the border of the millpond. The schoolhouse being deserted soon fell to decay, and was reported to be haunted by the ghost of the unfortunate pedagogue and the plowboy, loitering homeward of a still summer evening, has often fancied his voice at a distance, chanting a melancholy psalm tune among the tranquil solitudes of Sleepy Hollow. 

Last line of "Postscript"

"Faith, sir," replied the story-teller, "as to that matter, I don't believe one-half of it myself." D.K.

 

CRITIQUE | THE TEXT | THE MOVIE